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NEPAL

In POETRY by Lee Weingrad

Nepal, the fragile beauty of this moment, celebration and mourning dance of what is and what is not, and what is yet to be.

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SONG FROM GUHYAGARBHA TANTRA

In TANTRIC POETRY by Erik Pema Kunsang

The voice is the voice of the awakened state and by singing it you grow closer to being what you fundamentally are. Herein lies a tremendous inspiration and blessing. This is the religion for our times, which transcends cultural limitations.

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A GATEWAY TO SHAMBHALA PART I

In STORYTELLING by Douglas J. Penick

The vision of Shambhala is not a vision of something seen, but rather a way of seeing and perceiving and acting in the context of the phenomenal world. The Kingdom of Shambhala is an innate and spontaneous longing to realize the freedom of the awakened state within the context of our existing social life.

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TAKING PICTURES WITHOUT JUDGEMENT

In VISUAL ART by Kimberly Poppe

In this way, photography is part of my spiritual practice, not spiritual in a special way, but in a very ordinary way, just simply being with whatever is. My teacher speaks about meditation not as meditating on something but being with. I find this to be an incredibly helpful instruction.

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BUDDING IN BETWEEN

In VISUAL ART by Jon Solomon

It’s spring here in France, and flower trees have started to bloom. Spring blossoms, a perennial source of metaphor, conjure up associations with new growth. According to a well-received tradition, they might also present a parable for transmission of spiritual realization.

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MUSIC, MYSTICISM AND HEALING ARE INTERVOVEN

In TIMELESS MUSIC by Johan Vedel

Music, especially the indigenous types, contain a certain element of mysticism, in that music can be used to experience unity with the divine or a higher power. Being a practitioner of Hindustani classical music for many years, I have experienced the healing properties of this music.

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THE UNFATHOMABLE EVERYDAY

In WRITERS by Michael Tweed

This makes me appreciate and want to emulate all the more those old brush and ink painters and poets of China, to strip the artistic act down to the most basic elements and to focus on the approach, the attention and, yes, the openness and vastness of life.