SURESHVARA – THE SECOND KING OF SHAMBHALA

In TANTRIC POETRY by Douglas J. Penick1 Comment

THE RADIANT SUCCESSION OF SHAMBHALA: DHARMA RAJAH SURESVARA

Now the second Dharma Rajah enters the Crystal Hall of the Kalapa Court. He is Dharma Raja Sureshvara, Lord of Asuras,
binding all beings by love in union with pure nowness.

The great Dharma King Sureshvara enters this world
As an emanation of Bodhisattva Kshitigharbha,
Who, because he loves all living beings as if he were their mother,
Is called: The Womb of Earth.

Kshitigharbha appears as a simple monk.
The mark of perfection shines on his forehead.
He holds the wish-fulfilling gem in his right hand.
Because his love supports all beings in the six realms,
He holds in his left hand, a staff with six rings.
Determined that none who are born shall linger in the bonds of suffering,
He is the protector of all children
And carries a child in the crook of his right arm.
He is the compassion of the Buddha,
Inseparable from every form of life,
The final liberator of all who suffer all the tortures of hell.

Ruling from within the Crystal Palace, the Dharma Lord Sureshvara
Sits at ease beside the wish-fulfilling tree
In a garden filled with fragrant trees.

His face is ruddy and his expression is determined and loving.
His hair and mustache are black and oiled.
He wears the gold crown of a dharma king
Surmounted by a ruby that glows like a dawn sun.

He wears a vermilion brocade robe adorned with gold garudas.
His sash is white as winter ocean spray.
He wears the gold necklaces, earrings and bracelets of an earth-protector.

In his right hand, he holds the gold Vajra prod
Which guides the mad elephant of mind
Through the jungles of claustrophobia and aggression,
In his left hand, he holds a rope of iron
Which draws all beings out of hell
With the ring of faith and hook of longing.

The sight of him overcomes all chaos, uncertainty, and anger
And one experiences complete confidence in the power of unconditional love.

In his unchanging secret form, the Dharma Raja Sureshvara
Is dark red in color like heart’s blood.
Youthful, naked to the waist,
He smiles and the sweetness of his expression pervades all space
Like the scent of honey suckle on a summer night.

He wears a crown of pink utpala flowers
And a scarf the color of laurel leaves.
He wears red pants and a skirt of blue brocade
Adorned with golden swirling clouds.
Because all aspects of the world are dear to him,
His body is adorned with gold necklaces.
And his arms with gold bracelets.
He sits on a throne before the coral and crystal gold-roofed palace of Kalapa
On a throne surmounted by the three jewels.

With his raised right hand, he plays an ivory damaru,
From which emerge all the vowels and consonants.
Thus all the senses vibrate in pure nowness.
In his left hand he holds a lotus the color of dawn
On which stands the blue jewel of the Buddha-nature itself,
Glowing amid the gold flames of all-consuming compassion.

His consort, gentle and white as a noon-day cloud,
Sits next to him holding the sun-disc of the complete power of mind.

This was extracted from The Brilliance of Naked Mind: Secret Visions of Gesar, King of Ling with the kind permission of the author Douglas J. Penick.

About the Author
Douglas J. Penick

Douglas J. Penick

Douglas Penick utilizes historical research with a solid understanding of Chinese culture and Buddhism to make stories accessible, beautiful and enlightening. In his words, “I contribute to the mischief, longing, satisfaction, lust, sorrow and fascination which make our presence in this world a discovery of true love.” The Website of Douglas. Other LEVEKUNST articles by the same author.

Painted scroll: © 2016 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Denman Waldo Ross Collection.

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Comments

  1. I love your beautiful and eloquent description, Doug. Thank you! I also have some kind of deep connection with Ksitigharba that came about unexpectedly after the passing of my teacher (and yours), CTR. He didn’t speak of Ksitigharbha that I know of but here he is, a double-agent of Shambhala/buddhism. Years ago, my husband and I bought a very, very old wooden, near life size statue of Ksitigharba which now sits in a storage area in Boulder, Co. until we determine where to place him. We believe he is protecting the area from life threatening fires, etc. At least we hope. He comes to mind every day and now I see his manifestation as a bodhisattva and as a king in a more “poetic” light.

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