View Post

PADMASAMBHAVA’S FOUR TEACHINGS TO THE DAKINI

In TRUE BOOKS by Erik Pema Kunsang3 Comments

The single vehicle is the understanding that all teachings are personal advice on how to soften rigid mind-habits, letting go of pointless aims, and then settling into a gentle presence that is both calm and kind. Our attention simply remains for a while in this way, at ease in itself with nothing that needs to be held or cast away. This aware steadiness is often called shamatha, being calm, and it is the basis for all higher or deeper states of authentic insight.

View Post

COMPASSIONATELY INCARNATED

In WISDOM TEACHERS by Tsultrim Allione0 Comments

I noticed two yogis were being held in high esteem. Since we were eating in the same tent, I had occasion to talk to them. I also noticed during the Drubchen that as everyone was chanting, doing mudras and so on, Drüpon Lama Karma and the other yogi just stared into space unmoving for hours on end. As I spoke to Drüpon Lama Karma, I realized he was a Dzogchen yogi who had done many years of retreat.

View Post

FOUR ELEMENTS INNER SPONTANEOUS SOUND YOGA

In INSIGHTS by James Corrigan4 Comments

It is also called: Astral sound, Dharmata Swayambhu Nada, Divine Tremoring, Eternal Sound, Inner Sound, Music of the Spheres, Primordial Sound, Sacred Sound, Shabda, Sound of Creation, Sound of Silence, also Thunder of Silence, Soundless Sound, Transcendental Sound, Unborn Sound, Unstruck Sound, and The Word of God.

View Post

A LIFE WELL LIVED

In WISDOM TEACHERS by Lyse Lauren0 Comments

Chadral Rinpoche encouraged us to recognize our ‘true nature,’ because absolutely nothing else will be of any use to us in the long run. This and this alone is the chief and crucial point. In recognizing and practicing, one brings into balance all other factors in one’s life.

View Post

INTRODUCTION TO GROUP STUDY OF SACRED BOOKS

In TRUE BOOKS by Bruce Newman2 Comments

Reading sections out loud invites us to delve deeper into the material. It is too easy to just skim over difficult material while reading by yourself but what you found difficult someone else probably did too. I’m always amazed in a class to learn what I read but didn’t really understand when someone inquires about it!

View Post

THE CO-EMERGING OF THE TANTRIC FEMININE & MASCULINE PRINCIPLES

In INSIGHTS by Therese George5 Comments

When we all are more aware of these innate principles or qualities in us, we are able to benefit ourselves and others through a deeper understanding and a more cooperative, non-dualistic way of being in the world. When we isolate or separate the two, there is division, tension and competition. This duality can create anger, aggression, hatred, fear, dishonesty and many other mental and emotional disturbances.

View Post

MEMORY AND IMPERMANENCE

In INSIGHTS by James Corrigan6 Comments

Scientists studying memories have found that memories are a most creative affair, morphing over time and with each recalling, until they bear little resemblance to an actual event. Like everything else, memories are impermanent, making the very idea of them a bit self-oxymoronic.

View Post

MACHIG LABDRON AND THE CHÖD TRADITION

In TRAINING by Malcolm Smith1 Comment

To sever attachment to home, family, and friends, chödpas moved from valley to valley, village to village, sacred place to sacred place, charnel ground to charnel ground, staying only for brief periods in small tents and under trees before moving on. They would camp in groups, but only as close as the sound of a kangling could reach.

View Post

AIM FOR BUDDHAHOOD IN THIS LIFETIME

In INSIGHTS by Alejandro Serrano0 Comments

Go for the highest goal, the real deal: full buddhahood in this lifetime. I’m not saying lower goals aren’t needed. The simplest meditation attainments help, of course. However, going for the highest goal opens more possibilities and yields more benefits you are probably not aware of.

View Post

WITHOUT EMOTION, THERE IS NO WAY TO PUT THINGS INTO EFFECT

In INSIGHTS by Sonia Gomes8 Comments

One of my first questions to a teacher was about emotions. In my mistaken view, Buddhists were people who had subjugated all their conflicts, and so they lived continually in a state of equilibrium, which, for me, made them unshakable, but also somewhat insensitive. If I practiced Buddhism, would I become a person in total self-control, cold and without emotions?